Eriogonum / Buckwheat

Genus: Eriogonum

Common Name: Buckwheat

details

Eriogonum is a native wildflower that attracts a host of small native bees and other pollinating insects. It also serves as a host plant for numerous butterfly species. The flowers, which appear in clusters of white, pink or yellow, appear in summer through fall. Eriogonum is a particularly important pollinator plant in natural ecosystems of California, the Great Basin and the southwest and also makes an excellent addition to pollinator gardens in these and other locales across North America.

 

Native Regions

Nationwide, the United States and Canada, with the exception of the Great Lakes region, New England and northeastern Canadian provinces

 

Availability

Eriogonum (buckwheat, wild buckwheat) native species, both annual and perennial, as well as many cultivars of this plant, are routinely available in garden stores and nurseries throughout North America. Wild buckwheat varieties can be grown easily in most regions of the U.S. and Canada.

 

Duration

Annual, perennial, depending upon species

 

Bloom Time

Summer, fall

 

Average Height

3 feet

 

Flower Color

Pink

Yellow 

White

 

Exposure

Full sun

 

Water Requirements

Dry

 

Recommended Species

Eriogonum fasciculatum (eastern Mojave buckwheat, California buckwheat) is a native perennial that grows to about 3 feet and is found naturally on dry slopes and canyons near the coast of California, from San Diego County north to Marin County. It is also found in Utah, Arizona, and northwestern Mexico. The flowers, which bloom from May through October, appear in clusters of white or pink. This plant is routinely available.

 

Eriogonum umbellatum (sulphur-flower buckwheat) is a native, low-growing (typically to 2 feet) perennial that attracts a wide variety of bees and other native pollinators. It is a larval host and nectar source for lupine blue butterfly (Plebejus lupini)Sulphur-flower buckwheat is native to western mountainous regions of North America at elevations of 700 to 12,000 feet. It is found from western Canada south to California and east into Colorado and New Mexico. As its name suggests, this buckwheat produces yellow to yellow-orange blossoms from June to October, depending upon elevation. Sulphur-flower buckwheat seeds and container plants are readily available from commercial sources.

 

Eriogonum heracleoides (whorled buckwheat, Wyeth buckwheat, parsnipflower buckwheat) is a native perennial that produces large splays of small, cream to yellow colored flowers and has tremendous potential for use in native landscaping and drought tolerant plantings in the semi-arid regions of western North America. The species range includes the Rocky Mountain and Intermountain western states from British Columbia and Alberta south to Utah and Nevada. Seeds for this species are available through the Native Seed Network.

bee Visitors

Andrena / Mining Bee

Anthidium / Carder Bee

Anthophora / Digger Bee

Augochlorella / Sweat Bee

Bombus / Bumble Bee

Ceratina / Small Carpenter Bee

Colletes / Polyester Bee

Diadasia / Sunflower Bee

Eucera / Long-horned Bee

Halictus / Sweat Bee

Hylaeus / Yellow-faced Bee

Lasioglossum / Sweat Bee

Megachile / Leafcutter Bee

Melissodes / Long-horned Bee

Nomada / Cuckoo Bee

Osmia / Mason Bee

Trachusa / Trachusa

Please reload

Contact us
  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon
  • Black Instagram Icon
  • Black YouTube Icon
  • Black Pinterest Icon

National Headquarters
660 Pennsylvania Ave, SE, #402
Washington, DC 20003
phone (202) 547-9359 | fax (202) 547-9429

office@centerforfoodsafety.org
 

www.centerforfoodsafety.org

© 2018 Center for Food Safety

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. This material is protected under International and Federal Copyright Laws and Treaties. Any unauthorized reprint or use of this material is prohibited. No text may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without express written permission or proper citation. Please credit any and all use of our work product to: Center for Food Safety, www.centerforfoodsafety.org.