Lavandula / Lavender
lavandula
lavandula

Lavender "Provence" (Lavendula x intermedia) with a honey bee visitor © Celeste Ets-Hokin

press to zoom
Lavender 1
Lavender 1

English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) in a residential garden © Matthew Shepherd

press to zoom
Lavender 2
Lavender 2

French lavender (Lavandula stoechas) © Matthew Shepherd

press to zoom
lavandula
lavandula

Lavender "Provence" (Lavendula x intermedia) with a honey bee visitor © Celeste Ets-Hokin

press to zoom
1/3

Genus: Lavandula

Common Name: Lavender

details

Though not native to North America, this Mediterranean plant has become popular with gardeners on this continent, as it is easily grown in moderate and warm climates across the United States. Most lavender species are productive bee plants, which require little water and are ideal for garden settings.

 

Native Regions

Not native to North America; introduced to California and New York

 

Availability

Routinely available, and appropriate for pollinator gardens and landscaping in moderate to warm climates across the United States

 

Duration

Perennial

 

Bloom Time

Spring, summer, fall

 

Average Height

3 feet

 

Flower Color

Purple

Lavender

Pink

White

 

Exposure

Full sun

 

Water Requirements

Average to dry

 

Recommended Species

Lavandula stoechas (French lavender, Spanish lavender) is a species of lavender native to Mediterranean countries. It has been widely introduced across the U.S., appealing to both gardeners and bees, alike. It produces lavender or pink flowers that bloom in flushes from early spring through fall.

 

Lavandula angustifolia (English lavender) is a native of the western Mediterranean region, is popular for its colorful flowers, its fragrance, its relative cold-hardiness and its ability to survive with low water consumption. Like other lavenders, it attracts a variety of native bees.

 

Lavandin (L. angustifolia x L. latifolia)  is another popular hybrid lavender for gardens and landscaping. ‘Provence’ (Lavandula x intermedia) is one of the most attractive of the Lavandins, taking its cultivar name from the area in southeastern France, where it is grown in large plantings for the perfume industry. Lavender flowers and gray foliage are heavily scented on this mounded, shrubby cultivar that typically grows to 3 feet. The productive blooms, which appear in summer, are highly attractive to many species of native bees.

bee Visitors

Anthidium / Carder Bee

Anthophora / Digger Bee

Bombus / Bumble Bee

Ceratina / Small Carpenter Bee

Habropoda / Digger Bee

Osmia / Mason Bee

Please reload